Council looks at dwelling ordinance

0
319

 

By Jonathan Smith

The Culver City Council approved a final reading of an ordinance amendment to city code that addresses accessory dwelling units.

The decision was made during a council meeting earlier this month. The ordinance was approved by 4-1. Councilman Göran Eriksson was the lone dissenting vote.

Accessory dwelling units are considered residential units that can be added to a lot with an existing single-family home. These units are typically separate buildings in a backyard, attached to or part of a primary house or a garage conversion.

The changed proposals were introduced to the city council because of changes in state law that allow accessory dwelling units.

Several council members expressed that allowing these units would help kick start adding (the addition of) cheaper housing to the city.

Regardless of how many of these units are built, the city will have its work cut out when it comes to addressing affordable housing.

“We have our foot on the gas, we are moving quickly as we can on programs approved during the budget meeting,” said Sol Brumfield, community development director for the city.

Accessory dwelling units are considered residential units that can be added to a lot with an existing single-family home. These units are typically separate buildings in a backyard, attached to or part of a primary house or a garage conversion.

The changed proposes were introduced to the city council because of changes in state law that allow accessory dwelling units.

In October, the ordinance amendment was introduced during a public hearing. Initially, the ordinance prohibited accessory dwelling units being constructed on top of garages, other structures, and single-family houses. But the restriction was taken out of the amendments because of several elected officials concerns that it was too restrictive and may not address the housing crisis concerns affecting the city.

During the November meeting, some of the audience members expressed reservation on a mandate that would force owners to live on the property if they want to add accessory units.

“This could negatively impact the construction of structures,” said Diana Coronado, the director of Government Affairs at Building Industry Association of Southern California – LA/Ventura Chapter.

Others, including Eriksson, took issue that these units could be erected on top of a garage.

 

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here